30th April 2023 to 7th May 2023

Tall Ship: Skye and the Small Isles

From £1031 per person

Deposit 50%. Balance due 12 weeks before departure
The small islands are an amazing experience often not seen been regular tourists.
Clear
Pay a 50% deposit per item
Suited to
Families, Couples, Individuals, Groups
Difficulty
No sailing experience is required. Sit back and relax or get as involved with crew life as you like. Learning to navigate, trim and set the sails, and helm the ship.
Nights onboard
7
Vessel type
Tall Ship - Flying Dutchman. Restored and renovated during the winter of 2003/2004, turning it into a luxury schooner.
Vessel length
39.55 m/ 129.7ft
Skipper
Yes
Berth Style
22 guests in 11 twin cabins. All cabins are en-suite and are twins. Twin Cabin Plus cabins are slightly larger in size.
Insurance Required
Yes

Come with us on a path that's much more serene and beautiful as we explore the small islands and sky.

7 Nights: 30 April to 07 May 2023

From: €1,145 / £1031 per person*

*Trips are priced in the operator’s local currency. The sterling amount shown is a guide only and the amount you pay in sterling will change with currency fluctuation

 

Itinerary

Day 1: Arrival at Oban  

You arrive in Oban, a cosy fishing village in a wonderful location in a beautiful bay. If you arrive earlier, you can leave your luggage on board and have a look in the village.
Ban is also known as the Pearl of the West Highlands, thanks to its winding alleys and picturesque bay, filled with yachts, ferries and small fishing boats. The McCraigs Tower, an unfinished replica of Rome’s Coliseum, dates back to the late nineteenth century. Its total size is over 192 meters, and the walls are over fourteen meters high in some places.

We are expected to be located at the North Pier, less than a hundred yards from the Oban whiskey distillery. In the evening you will be welcomed on board where you will get to know the crew and the other guests. Afterwards, there is a nice welcome dinner and we raise the glass on a beautiful trip to Scotland.

Day 2: Muck

On our way to Muck, we pass the magnificently restored Duart Castle on the way to Oban. After leaving Oban, we sail along the sound between Morvern and Mull. Muck is the smallest of the “Small Isles” with 38 permanent residents. Muck is only 3 kilometres long and 1.5 kilometres wide. Its fertile hillside landscape and white sand beaches make it easy to manipulate. The highest elevation is Beinn Airein with just under 138 meters and is quite easy to climb. If you climb it from the west, it is much more challenging. Several waterbirds, as well as parrot birds nest on the island, and can be seen during hikes on horses at low water. Caisteal and Duin Bhain, prehistoric fortresses, can also be visited.

About 40 bird species regularly use Muck as a breeding ground, many more come at irregular intervals. Because of the Gulf Stream life in the water is particularly rich and varied. From time to time you can see some seals at the beaches, and in the late summer months, you can even see a huge shark. A popular motif is the Highland Ponies, which are bred here in small style.

Day 3: Island Rum – a natural diamond in the Atlantic

This island has a shape similar to a rhombus and is the largest of the “Small Isles” with 12 square kilometres. Its seclusion and impressive silhouette attract visitors who are very interested in its surroundings. The island offers a wide range of hiking trails, starting with short distances up to the summits of the Rum mountains, where you will meet a spectacular animal world with eagles, parrot dummies, deer, and hardened rum ponies. As well as hunting and game, other leisure activities are available, including cycling, fishing, kayaking, and canoeing. Scientists worldwide are fascinated by Rum’s unique geology, which includes its ancient volcanic core, which formed the now visible Rum mountains. A national natural conservation area was established in 1957 for Rum, which is an important part of the country’s natural heritage. Today, it is owned by “Scottish Natural Heritage”, the agency that has written the conservation of natural treasures in Scotland.
One of the most popular day trips is a guided tour of Kinloch Castle, giving visitors a fascinating insight into the life of the Bullough family who built the castle between 1897 and 1900. The castle houses an “orchestrion” made in Germany, which imitates the sound of a whole orchestra by scanning punched paper rolls. The instrument was made around 1900 by Imhof & Muckle of Vohrenbach near Baden and of the three still existing, this is the only still functional and still plays today for the audience. To the west of the island is the Harris Mausoleum, built by the Bullough family in the style of a Greek temple in column optics. The monument is located in the direction of the thundering Atlantic and offers a fantastic panorama view of the unique mountain landscape of the island.

Rum is also a shelter for many animals, and trained gamekeepers offer many activities, walks, and talks that deal with the great variety of flora and fauna. Interested friends of nature even have the opportunity to work as volunteers during their stay. There is a small but lively community of 40 permanent residents. Trust is the owner of the country around Kinloch Village and has plans for further development. Next to the community centre is a well-stocked small shop as well as a tea room, which during the summer month has homemade cakes, delicious lunch, and other small refreshments on offer. On the island, there is also a shop selling art and a small photo gallery.

Day 4 & 5: Skye

Skye is a magical island, the largest of the Inner Hebrides, and home to some of Scotland’s most stunning landscapes. With its mountain chains and miles of breathtaking coastline, this island inspires in many ways.

A large part of Skye can be discovered by bus, including the famous Talisker brewery.

Day 6: Tobermory

After a nice breakfast, we set sail to Tobermory with its beautiful coloured houses on the water and its famous whiskey distillery. In Tobermory, you can visit the whiskey distillery where you can get a guided tour, the small Tobermory Museum, and the Marine Exhibition where attention is paid to the local waters and the activities in the harbour.

Day 7: Oban

We’re sailing back to Oban. We enjoy the untouched, wild nature of the Scottish islands. The rugged beauty of Mull, the silence on the water, the indescribable landscape, the jagged coast with its surprising bays, the quiet fishing villages, and the magnificent view of the islands in the distance.

Day 8: Oban

Unfortunately, our trip to the Small Islands  & Skye ends after an eventful week. After a good breakfast, it’s time to say goodbye.

Please note: With all tours as exciting as this, we can be at the mercy of prevailing conditions, particularly the weather. So, a degree of flexibility and an open-minded attitude is helpful. Should we make any changes to the itinerary, we will ensure you have an equally engaging and insightful experience.

  • All charges regarding port fees, tourist fees, and fuel expenses.
  • Bed linen and towels
  • Full board, including coffee, tea, milk, and juice at all meals.
  • The use of a zodiac for landings when we visit places without a harbor.
  • The crew: captain, cook, and first mate.
  • Transport to and from the vessel
  • Personal expenses ashore
  • Food ashore
  • Fees for events that take place outside the ship.
  • Beverages besides the included drinks during the meals.

ACCOMMODATION

T/S Flying Dutchman

This is not a floating hotel but a traditional sailing ship that is comfortable, intimate, and small enough to anchor directly next to many of the distilleries. Alongside the crew and Barry’s lodging, the ship has a berth for 22 guests. It was restored and renovated during the winter of 2003/2004, turning it into a luxury schooner.

The ship has a large deck area on which you can sit and soak up the sun. There is a cozy bar in the deckhouse and plenty of room for eating together on deck.

Cabins

All of the cabins on board are twin en-suites with air-conditioning. Please don’t forget to bring a European plug adapter to plug your electrical devices into your cabins.

Twin Cabin & Ensuite

Oban, Scotland

Back to Oban

Itinerary

Day 1: Arrival at Oban  

You arrive in Oban, a cosy fishing village in a wonderful location in a beautiful bay. If you arrive earlier, you can leave your luggage on board and have a look in the village.
Ban is also known as the Pearl of the West Highlands, thanks to its winding alleys and picturesque bay, filled with yachts, ferries and small fishing boats. The McCraigs Tower, an unfinished replica of Rome’s Coliseum, dates back to the late nineteenth century. Its total size is over 192 meters, and the walls are over fourteen meters high in some places.

We are expected to be located at the North Pier, less than a hundred yards from the Oban whiskey distillery. In the evening you will be welcomed on board where you will get to know the crew and the other guests. Afterwards, there is a nice welcome dinner and we raise the glass on a beautiful trip to Scotland.

Day 2: Muck

On our way to Muck, we pass the magnificently restored Duart Castle on the way to Oban. After leaving Oban, we sail along the sound between Morvern and Mull. Muck is the smallest of the “Small Isles” with 38 permanent residents. Muck is only 3 kilometres long and 1.5 kilometres wide. Its fertile hillside landscape and white sand beaches make it easy to manipulate. The highest elevation is Beinn Airein with just under 138 meters and is quite easy to climb. If you climb it from the west, it is much more challenging. Several waterbirds, as well as parrot birds nest on the island, and can be seen during hikes on horses at low water. Caisteal and Duin Bhain, prehistoric fortresses, can also be visited.

About 40 bird species regularly use Muck as a breeding ground, many more come at irregular intervals. Because of the Gulf Stream life in the water is particularly rich and varied. From time to time you can see some seals at the beaches, and in the late summer months, you can even see a huge shark. A popular motif is the Highland Ponies, which are bred here in small style.

Day 3: Island Rum – a natural diamond in the Atlantic

This island has a shape similar to a rhombus and is the largest of the “Small Isles” with 12 square kilometres. Its seclusion and impressive silhouette attract visitors who are very interested in its surroundings. The island offers a wide range of hiking trails, starting with short distances up to the summits of the Rum mountains, where you will meet a spectacular animal world with eagles, parrot dummies, deer, and hardened rum ponies. As well as hunting and game, other leisure activities are available, including cycling, fishing, kayaking, and canoeing. Scientists worldwide are fascinated by Rum’s unique geology, which includes its ancient volcanic core, which formed the now visible Rum mountains. A national natural conservation area was established in 1957 for Rum, which is an important part of the country’s natural heritage. Today, it is owned by “Scottish Natural Heritage”, the agency that has written the conservation of natural treasures in Scotland.
One of the most popular day trips is a guided tour of Kinloch Castle, giving visitors a fascinating insight into the life of the Bullough family who built the castle between 1897 and 1900. The castle houses an “orchestrion” made in Germany, which imitates the sound of a whole orchestra by scanning punched paper rolls. The instrument was made around 1900 by Imhof & Muckle of Vohrenbach near Baden and of the three still existing, this is the only still functional and still plays today for the audience. To the west of the island is the Harris Mausoleum, built by the Bullough family in the style of a Greek temple in column optics. The monument is located in the direction of the thundering Atlantic and offers a fantastic panorama view of the unique mountain landscape of the island.

Rum is also a shelter for many animals, and trained gamekeepers offer many activities, walks, and talks that deal with the great variety of flora and fauna. Interested friends of nature even have the opportunity to work as volunteers during their stay. There is a small but lively community of 40 permanent residents. Trust is the owner of the country around Kinloch Village and has plans for further development. Next to the community centre is a well-stocked small shop as well as a tea room, which during the summer month has homemade cakes, delicious lunch, and other small refreshments on offer. On the island, there is also a shop selling art and a small photo gallery.

Day 4 & 5: Skye

Skye is a magical island, the largest of the Inner Hebrides, and home to some of Scotland’s most stunning landscapes. With its mountain chains and miles of breathtaking coastline, this island inspires in many ways.

A large part of Skye can be discovered by bus, including the famous Talisker brewery.

Day 6: Tobermory

After a nice breakfast, we set sail to Tobermory with its beautiful coloured houses on the water and its famous whiskey distillery. In Tobermory, you can visit the whiskey distillery where you can get a guided tour, the small Tobermory Museum, and the Marine Exhibition where attention is paid to the local waters and the activities in the harbour.

Day 7: Oban

We’re sailing back to Oban. We enjoy the untouched, wild nature of the Scottish islands. The rugged beauty of Mull, the silence on the water, the indescribable landscape, the jagged coast with its surprising bays, the quiet fishing villages, and the magnificent view of the islands in the distance.

Day 8: Oban

Unfortunately, our trip to the Small Islands  & Skye ends after an eventful week. After a good breakfast, it’s time to say goodbye.

Please note: With all tours as exciting as this, we can be at the mercy of prevailing conditions, particularly the weather. So, a degree of flexibility and an open-minded attitude is helpful. Should we make any changes to the itinerary, we will ensure you have an equally engaging and insightful experience.

Warm and waterproof clothing is very important, as it can get very cold during sailing, especially at night, even in the summer. A waterproof and windproof jacket is recommended to help keep warm and dry. Waterproof rubber-soled boots or shoes are also recommended to keep your feet dry and warm. Pack comfortable and practical clothing for all weather circumstances, the key is layers. It is recommended to pack in a soft bag that can be easily stored away as there is no locker room onboard for suitcases. Also in the cabins, there are 2-pin European plug sockets and USB sockets so guests will need to bring adapters if they are from outside the EU.

List of items we recommend you bring with you; these are not mandatory.

  • Warm hat and gloves
  • Adaptor for European Socket
  • Wet weather clothing – waterproof and windproof jacket
  • Clothing –enough clothing for all weather circumstances (think layers and quick dry clothes)
  • Wellies or waterproof shoes
  • Walking boots, shoes for onshore and trainers with good grip
  • Sea Sickness and personal medication
  • Small Torch (head torches are good)
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