27th August 2022 to 31st August 2022

Tall Ship: Bank Holiday Hebrides Explorer

£1092 per person

Deposit 25%. Final balance due 12 weeks before departure
Explore the west coast of Scotland on a three-masted schooner

In stock

Pay a 25% deposit per item
Suited to
Families, Couples, Individuals, Groups
Difficulty
This trip is suitable for both beginner and advanced sailors
Nights onboard
5
Vessel type
Topsail Schooner
Vessel length
32.7m
Skipper
Yes
Berth Style
En suite bunk beds
Insurance Required
Yes

Explore the rugged scenery and hidden gems of the Inner Hebrides archipelago and Argyll on our tall ship Blue Clipper.

5 nights: 27 - 31 August 2022

Price: £1,092 per person

From our base in the picturesque port town of Mallaig of the places we hope to visit are the islands of The Small Isles, Barra and Vatersay, Outer Hebrides, Mingulay, North Uist, South Uist and Skye.

Your adventure begins in Mallaig, the bustling and thriving port on the north west coast along the famous road to the Isles.  The town is a fascinating place where visitors can soak up the atmosphere of a working fishing port but at the same time its remote location makes it a great place to relax.  Try the pleasant Mallaig Circuit walk which has great views over Mallaig harbour and across Loch Nevis to Knoydart.  Getting to Mallaig is also one of the highlights of this voyage, with one of the most spectacular train journeys in the UK between Glasgow and Mallaig.

Some of the islands we hope to visit:

The Small Isles

Rum is the largest island of the group and is owned by Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) who run the island as a National Nature Reserve.  The island is formed from an old volcanic plug, and has its own Cuillin (rocky ridge) which is often confused with that on Skye when viewed from a distance.  Visitors are able to follow two small nature trails laid out around the village of Kinloch where there is also a village shop that is usually open in the evening.  A guided tour of Kinloch Castle is a must – the castle almost exactly as it was left in the 1950’s by the former owners, the wealthy but eccentric Bullough family.

Eigg is the second largest island of the group, and is owned by a Community Trust which purchased the island in 1997, the most recent of inhabitants in the 8,000 plus years that the island has been inhabited.  As with Rum the island is rich in wildlife and geology, whilst for a spot of ‘sun and surf’ Laig Beach and the Singing Sands are recommended.

Canna is the most westerly of the Small Isles and is owned by the National Trust for Scotland who have farmed it since 1981.  Like the rest of the island group Canna has many sites of archaeological interest and has links to the Neolithic, Columbian and Viking eras.  It has been a bird sanctuary since 1938, and over 150 species of birds have been monitored in the last 40 years.

Muck is the smallest of the small isles at 2 miles x 3/4 mile wide. Basking Sharks, Minke Whales, Dolphins, Porpoises and even Orcas are seen in the waters around Muck. A visit to the craft and tea shop near the harbour at Port Mòr is a must for delicious home-baked goods and a locally made gift.

Barra and Vatersay, Outer Hebrides.

Walk, hire a bike or kayak around the island with its white sandy beaches and breathtaking scenery.

From Castlebay you will see Kisimul castle – ‘the castle in the sea’. Take a trip across the causeway to the even smaller  idyllic island of Vatersay.

Buy some Hebridean toffee at Macroons Tea room or have a wee dram in the Castlebay bar.

Mingulay

Owned by the National Trust of Scotland and uninhabited except for about 500 sheep!

A wild and beautiful island with caves, sea stacks, turquoise waters and  an abundance of seabirds.

North Uist

Described as a paradise for wildlife and beach lovers. North Uist has stunning Atlantic beaches for example at Traigh Iar – a stunning stretch of white beach, backed by sweeping dunes, and Balnarald RSPB nature reserve, a beautiful reserve on the north west coast of North Uist with sandy beaches, rocky foreshore, marshes and sand dunes.

South Uist

An island with stunning white powder beaches, heather uplands, golden eagles and rare corncrake. Discover the oldest (reportedly) rocks in Britain at Ardivachar Point, in the north west corner of the island or visit the Hebridean Woolshed to the South of the Island for high quality local crafts.

Skye

We hope to stop at Loch Scavaig – one of the most dramatic of the Hebridean anchorages with the backdrop of the rocky mountain range – The  Cuillen.

  • All meals on board – including daily breakfast, lunch and evening meal
  • Refreshments throughout the day
  • Use of safety equipment
  • Accommodation in a twin en suite cabin
  • All instruction and lectures on board by fully qualified crew
  • Travel to and from the boat
  • Personal travel insurance
  • Alcoholic and soft drinks
  • Any shore excursions and meals onshore (unless otherwise stated)
  • VISA fees

ABOUT THE SHIP

Blue Clipper is a three-masted gaff rig schooner. This means that the sails are rigged to run from forward to aft along the length of the ship. There are 10 sails, with an area of 675m2. She has a steel hull and teak deck, steel masts and wooden booms/topmasts.

Below deck Blue Clipper has three main compartments. Furthest forward is the forepeak, with 4 trainee berths and 2 crew bunks. In midships we have the guest accommodation with 6 twin ensuite cabins and a family cabin for 4-6.  Furthest aft there is the crew quarters, with 4 twin cabins and a shared bathroom. The engine room and lazarette are also located at the aft of the ship. At full capacity, the ship can accommodate 30 people. The deckhouses are home to the galley, the saloon and the wheelhouse.

The ship usually sails with 8 crew, made up of experienced permanent crew and eager volunteers, wanting to put their sailing knowledge and experience to good use.

MEALS

All meals are included in the price of your voyage along with tea and coffee. Breakfast, Lunch, cake in the afternoon and Dinner are prepared by our lovely chef and served in the comfortable saloon. Alcoholic drinks are available during meal times, at anchor and when the vessel is alongside in port.

PASSPORTS AND VISAS

If your voyage is sailing in foreign waters, you will require a full passport that is valid for at least 6 months after the end of the voyage. You will be responsible for obtaining any necessary visas.

INSURANCE

The vessel has Third Party Liability Insurance. All those sailing are required to take out relevant travel insurance to cover their voyage.

MEDICAL CONDITIONS AND SPECIAL DIETS

Please inform us in advance of any medical conditions you have and medication which you might need to bring with you. If you have any special dietary requirements it is essential you inform us prior to your voyage. We will make every effort to cater for all diets with prior notice.

Mallaig, Scotland

Mallaig, Scotland

Your adventure begins in Mallaig, the bustling and thriving port on the north west coast along the famous road to the Isles.  The town is a fascinating place where visitors can soak up the atmosphere of a working fishing port but at the same time its remote location makes it a great place to relax.  Try the pleasant Mallaig Circuit walk which has great views over Mallaig harbour and across Loch Nevis to Knoydart.  Getting to Mallaig is also one of the highlights of this voyage, with one of the most spectacular train journeys in the UK between Glasgow and Mallaig.

Some of the islands we hope to visit:

The Small Isles

Rum is the largest island of the group and is owned by Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) who run the island as a National Nature Reserve.  The island is formed from an old volcanic plug, and has its own Cuillin (rocky ridge) which is often confused with that on Skye when viewed from a distance.  Visitors are able to follow two small nature trails laid out around the village of Kinloch where there is also a village shop that is usually open in the evening.  A guided tour of Kinloch Castle is a must – the castle almost exactly as it was left in the 1950’s by the former owners, the wealthy but eccentric Bullough family.

Eigg is the second largest island of the group, and is owned by a Community Trust which purchased the island in 1997, the most recent of inhabitants in the 8,000 plus years that the island has been inhabited.  As with Rum the island is rich in wildlife and geology, whilst for a spot of ‘sun and surf’ Laig Beach and the Singing Sands are recommended.

Canna is the most westerly of the Small Isles and is owned by the National Trust for Scotland who have farmed it since 1981.  Like the rest of the island group Canna has many sites of archaeological interest and has links to the Neolithic, Columbian and Viking eras.  It has been a bird sanctuary since 1938, and over 150 species of birds have been monitored in the last 40 years.

Muck is the smallest of the small isles at 2 miles x 3/4 mile wide. Basking Sharks, Minke Whales, Dolphins, Porpoises and even Orcas are seen in the waters around Muck. A visit to the craft and tea shop near the harbour at Port Mòr is a must for delicious home-baked goods and a locally made gift.

Barra and Vatersay, Outer Hebrides.

Walk, hire a bike or kayak around the island with its white sandy beaches and breathtaking scenery.

From Castlebay you will see Kisimul castle – ‘the castle in the sea’. Take a trip across the causeway to the even smaller  idyllic island of Vatersay.

Buy some Hebridean toffee at Macroons Tea room or have a wee dram in the Castlebay bar.

Mingulay

Owned by the National Trust of Scotland and uninhabited except for about 500 sheep!

A wild and beautiful island with caves, sea stacks, turquoise waters and  an abundance of seabirds.

North Uist

Described as a paradise for wildlife and beach lovers. North Uist has stunning Atlantic beaches for example at Traigh Iar – a stunning stretch of white beach, backed by sweeping dunes, and Balnarald RSPB nature reserve, a beautiful reserve on the north west coast of North Uist with sandy beaches, rocky foreshore, marshes and sand dunes.

South Uist

An island with stunning white powder beaches, heather uplands, golden eagles and rare corncrake. Discover the oldest (reportedly) rocks in Britain at Ardivachar Point, in the north west corner of the island or visit the Hebridean Woolshed to the South of the Island for high quality local crafts.

Skye

We hope to stop at Loch Scavaig – one of the most dramatic of the Hebridean anchorages with the backdrop of the rocky mountain range – The  Cuillen.

Warm and waterproof clothing is very important, as it can get very cold during sailing, especially at night, even in the summer. A waterproof and windproof jacket is recommended to help keep warm and dry. Waterproof rubber-soled boots or shoes are also recommended to keep your feet dry and warm. Pack comfortable and practical clothing for all weather circumstances, the key is layers. It is recommended to pack in a soft bag that can be easily stored away as there is no room onboard for suitcases.

What we recommend you bring

  • Warm hat and gloves
  • Wet weather clothing – waterproof and windproof jacket
  • Clothing – enough clothing for all weather circumstances (think layers!!)
  • Deck boots or Deck shoes
  • Adaptor for European socket
  • Trainers or pumps (think of your old school plimsolls!)
  • Swimming gear
  • Toiletries
  • Towels
  • Sun cream
  • Sunglasses
  • Sea sickness medication
  • Personal medication
  • Book
  • Camera
  • Valid passport (voyages outside the UK)
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