+44 2080 128 209

Various dates available

Tall Ship: St. Kilda and Outer Hebrides Expedition

From £1288 per person

Deposit 50%. Trip balance due 12 weeks before departure.
This amazing Island is home to the most unique and intriguing wildlife.
Clear
Pay a 50% deposit per item

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Suited to
Families, Couples, Individuals, Groups
Difficulty
No sailing experience is required. Sit back and relax or get as involved with crew life as you like. Learning to navigate, trim and set the sails, and helm the ship.
Nights onboard
8
Vessel type
Tall Ship - Flying Dutchman. Restored and renovated during the winter of 2003/2004, turning it into a luxury schooner.
Vessel length
39.55 m/ 129.7ft
Skipper
Yes
Berth Style
22 guests in 11 twin cabins. All cabins are en-suite and are twins. Twin Cabin Plus cabins are slightly larger in size.
Insurance Required
Yes

St. Kilda Scotland. The history of the people and amazing wildlife make the islands an exceptional destination for anyone.  

8 Nights: 20- 28 July 2023  &  28 July to 05 August 2023

From: €1,425 / £1,288 per person*

* Trips are priced in the operator’s local currency. The sterling amount shown is a guide only and the amount you pay in sterling will change with currency fluctuations.

The island of St. Kilda is 45 miles west of the Outer Hebrides and is a world heritage site. It was once home to one of Britain's most isolated communities, which was interested in natural history. A person must experience the silence, the breathtaking views, the rugged coasts with hidden coves, and the unique view of the islands in the distance in his life. The Flying Dutchman will take you to these special islands that are only accessible by ship.

Itinerary

The specified program is a guide. Changes due to the effects of weather, currents, and wind are possible. Flexibility is required for this trip. The Focus point of this voyage will be to reach St. Kilda.

Day 1: Oban

We start our sailing trip to St.Kilda in Oban, a cozy fishing village with lots to do. You will be welcomed on board at 18.00 to meet the crew and other guests. After everyone is settled, we’ll have a welcome dinner and toast the wonderful trip.

Day 2: The Isle of Canna

The trip to Canna begins very early in the morning. It is known as the ‘garden of the Hebrides’ for its fertile soil, green meadows, and abundant wildlife. A bird sanctuary since 1938, it is home to over 20,000 seabirds, including puffins, razorbills, and guillemots. The Duart Castle is a magnificent sight from the water as we pass by.

Day 3: Lewis and Harris

Our Sailing to St.Kilda continues with a visit to the outer Hebrides Harris and Lewis.  You can see here the landscape that inspired the beautiful Harris Tweed. It is the southern part of the outer Hebrides with deep bays and high mountains. The west coast of the island of Harris has stunning beaches, flanked by dunes and Machair (a unique plant). The islands are so remote that few tourists bother to come here.

Day 4 & 5 St.Kilda Scotland

Our sailing tour to St. Kilda begins at first light. The volcanic archipelago consists of Hirta, Dun, Soay, and Boreray, and is situated off the coast of the Hebrides. Among the highest cliffs in Europe, St.Kilda is home to large colonies of rare and endangered birds, such as puffins and gannets.

There are traces of over 2000 years of human habitation on the archipelago. They contain the fragile remnants of a self-sufficient economy that relied on agriculture, sheep farming, and birds. There are hundreds of small stone huts known as openings used to store the Guga on land, so guests can walk through the abandoned village, then climb the edge of Britain’s steepest cliffs. Be sure to get a St. Kilda stamp in your passport before returning to the ship! Rare Soay sheep roam here, a primitive breed of domestic sheep.

Stac Lee and Boreray

Our tour takes us to the archipelago, towards Stac Lee and Boreray, where we can see the largest gannet colony in the world, circling the cliffs as they nest.

Photograph puffins, guillemots, and auks breeding in the caves. Seals can often be seen sunning on rocks or fishing in the sound. In addition to the eagles and deer roaming the skies and land, the western islands are home to basking sharks and minke whales that feed on plankton.

Day 6: Barra

Our sailing trip today takes us to Barra. We moor in Castlebay, where we visit Kisimul Castle, the only medieval castle still standing in Barra.

Day 7: Tobermory

Tobermory, a picturesque fishing village with a sociable center and wonderful pubs and restaurants, is the main town of Mull we visit daily. There is the opportunity to visit the local distillery if time permits. The lively port is the starting point for a small fishing fleet.

Day 8: Scottish west coast and Oban

In the morning, we sail back to Oban after enjoying a nice breakfast. We can see the pristine coast of Mull and the mountains in the distance as we sail. Upon arrival in Oban, we’ll have a nice dinner together and maybe you’ll want to go to a pub to listen to some traditional music in the evening.

Day 9: Oban

Unfortunately, the beautiful Sailing trip to Skye / Hebrides has come to an end. After a good breakfast, it is time to say goodbye to the Flying Dutchman and its crew.

  • All charges regarding port fees, tourists fees and fuel expenses.
  • Bed linen and towels
  • Full board, including coffee, tea, milk and juice at all meals.
  • The use of a zodiac for landings when we visit places without a harbour.
  • The crew: captain, cook and first mate.
  • Transport to and from the vessel
  • Personal expenses ashore
  • Food ashore
  • Fees for events that take place outside the ship.
  • Beverages besides the included drinks during the meals.

ACCOMMODATION

T/S Flying Dutchman

This is not a floating hotel but a traditional sailing ship that is comfortable, intimate and small enough to anchor directly next to many of the distilleries. Alongside the crew and Barry’s lodging, the ship has berth for 22 guests. It was restored and renovated during the winter of 2003/2004, turning it into a luxury schooner.

The ship has a large deck area on which you can sit and soak up the sun. There is a cosy bar in the deckhouse and plenty of room for eating together on deck.

Cabins

All of the cabins on board are twin en-suites with air-conditioning.. Please don’t forget to bring a European plug adapter to plug your electrical devices in your cabins.

Twin Cabin & Ensuite

Oban, Scotland

Oban, Scotland

Itinerary

The specified program is a guide. Changes due to the effects of weather, currents, and wind are possible. Flexibility is required for this trip. The Focus point of this voyage will be to reach St. Kilda.

Day 1: Oban

We start our sailing trip to St.Kilda in Oban, a cozy fishing village with lots to do. You will be welcomed on board at 18.00 to meet the crew and other guests. After everyone is settled, we’ll have a welcome dinner and toast the wonderful trip.

Day 2: The Isle of Canna

The trip to Canna begins very early in the morning. It is known as the ‘garden of the Hebrides’ for its fertile soil, green meadows, and abundant wildlife. A bird sanctuary since 1938, it is home to over 20,000 seabirds, including puffins, razorbills, and guillemots. The Duart Castle is a magnificent sight from the water as we pass by.

Day 3: Lewis and Harris

Our Sailing to St.Kilda continues with a visit to the outer Hebrides Harris and Lewis.  You can see here the landscape that inspired the beautiful Harris Tweed. It is the southern part of the outer Hebrides with deep bays and high mountains. The west coast of the island of Harris has stunning beaches, flanked by dunes and Machair (a unique plant). The islands are so remote that few tourists bother to come here.

Day 4 & 5 St.Kilda Scotland

Our sailing tour to St. Kilda begins at first light. The volcanic archipelago consists of Hirta, Dun, Soay, and Boreray, and is situated off the coast of the Hebrides. Among the highest cliffs in Europe, St.Kilda is home to large colonies of rare and endangered birds, such as puffins and gannets.

There are traces of over 2000 years of human habitation on the archipelago. They contain the fragile remnants of a self-sufficient economy that relied on agriculture, sheep farming, and birds. There are hundreds of small stone huts known as openings used to store the Guga on land, so guests can walk through the abandoned village, then climb the edge of Britain’s steepest cliffs. Be sure to get a St. Kilda stamp in your passport before returning to the ship! Rare Soay sheep roam here, a primitive breed of domestic sheep.

Stac Lee and Boreray

Our tour takes us to the archipelago, towards Stac Lee and Boreray, where we can see the largest gannet colony in the world, circling the cliffs as they nest.

Photograph puffins, guillemots, and auks breeding in the caves. Seals can often be seen sunning on rocks or fishing in the sound. In addition to the eagles and deer roaming the skies and land, the western islands are home to basking sharks and minke whales that feed on plankton.

Day 6: Barra

Our sailing trip today takes us to Barra. We moor in Castlebay, where we visit Kisimul Castle, the only medieval castle still standing in Barra.

Day 7: Tobermory

Tobermory, a picturesque fishing village with a sociable center and wonderful pubs and restaurants, is the main town of Mull we visit daily. There is the opportunity to visit the local distillery if time permits. The lively port is the starting point for a small fishing fleet.

Day 8: Scottish west coast and Oban

In the morning, we sail back to Oban after enjoying a nice breakfast. We can see the pristine coast of Mull and the mountains in the distance as we sail. Upon arrival in Oban, we’ll have a nice dinner together and maybe you’ll want to go to a pub to listen to some traditional music in the evening.

Day 9: Oban

Unfortunately, the beautiful Sailing trip to Skye / Hebrides has come to an end. After a good breakfast, it is time to say goodbye to the Flying Dutchman and its crew.

Warm and waterproof clothing is very important, as it can get very cold during sailing, especially at night, even in the summer. A waterproof and windproof jacket is recommended to help keep warm and dry. Waterproof rubber-soled boots or shoes are also recommended to keep your feet dry and warm. Pack comfortable and practical clothing for all weather circumstances, the key is layers. It is recommended to pack in a soft bag that can be easily stored away as there is no locker room onboard for suitcases. Also in the cabins, there are 2 pin European plug sockets and USB sockets so guests will need to bring adapters if they are from outside the EU.

List of items we recommend you bring with you; these are not mandatory.

  • Warm hat and gloves
  • Adaptor for European Socket
  • Wet weather clothing – waterproof and windproof jacket
  • Clothing –enough clothing for all weather circumstances (think layers and quick dry clothes)
  • Wellies or waterproof shoes
  • Walking boots, shoes for onshore, and trainers with good grip
  • Sea Sickness and personal medication
  • Small Torch (head torches are good)